Literary Journals
Sublevel and Westwind: Two more journals for Los Angeles writers

Sublevel and Westwind: Two more journals for Los Angeles writers

Just eight months ago I wrote about 12 literary journals for Los Angeles writers — and since then, I’ve discovered two more! Read, enjoy, and submit — Sublevel. CalArts’s longtime lit magazine Black Clock folded a little while back, but in its place a newer, even edgier literary magazine has launched. Sublevel is “devoted to the nexus of literature, poetics, art, criticism, philosophy, culture, & politics,” and its editors “make no hard distinctions between creative and critical enterprise.” In addition to (mostly experimental) writing, the zine includes conversations and art. The main issues go up online, but Sublevel also publishes a supplementary print edition — called B-Sides. The first issue was edited by Maggie Nelson and Janice Lee — but both of these CalArts faculty members are leaving the institution this year, Maggie heading to USC and Janice to Portland State University. It’s unclear who’ll head up the second issue. In the meantime, enjoy browsing the first — Westwind. Unbeknownst to me until two weeks ago, the English department at UCLA has been publishing Westwind, UCLA’s journal of the arts, for over 50 years now! These days, Westwind publishes online issues in the fall and winter, along with an annual […]

Angels Flight • literary west Salon: Cocktails, cafeteria food, and literary conversation

Angels Flight • literary west Salon: Cocktails, cafeteria food, and literary conversation

Get your favorite cafeteria food and drink your fancy cocktails too — while enjoying literary conversations. Come to the next Angels Flight • literary west Salon — where I’ll be chatting with fellow author Lilliam Rivera! But first about the salon: Put together by local literary journal Angels Flight • literary west, these monthly events happen at Clifton’s Republic in the second-floor Ballroom — a lovely historic space with idiosyncratic decor, including a lion that looks over the proceedings! Each event brings together a pair of featured writers who read a bit and discuss their work in conversation. Below are Matthew Specktor and Tyler Malone who talked at the February event. Afterwards, a handful of writers recently published in the journal give lively readings. Then, attendees mingle, eat, and drink — since after all, Clifton’s has a cafeteria and a handful of bars with fancy cocktails. In case you’re not familiar with Angels Flight • literary west, this online zine seeks specifically to “explore uncharted stories of Los Angeles and beyond,” with a new issue coming out every six months. Want to read at a future salon? Submit your work to the journal for consideration! Want to attend future salons? […]

12 Literary journals for Los Angeles writers

12 Literary journals for Los Angeles writers

Get to know your local literary journals, and you’ll get to know your local literary community. Literary journals not only publish the work of local writers, but also hold readings where you can meet the readers, authors, and editors — as well as offer opportunities to get involved. Here are eleven literary journals for Angelenos to watch: Santa Monica Review. Founded by Jim Krusoe back in 1988, this well-established and respected literary magazine published some of Aimee Bender’s earliest works. The all-fiction print zine is published twice a year out of Santa Monica College. The next issue launches soon with a reading Oct. 9 in Santa Monica. Los Angeles Review. Once a biannual print journal, LAR will launch a new online format come June 2017, becoming a weekly online journal with a best-of annual print edition. Its goal to publish “the voice of Los Angeles, and the voice of the nation” will remain the same, though I imagine the website will change significantly. LAR is published by Red Hen Press; sign up for the press’ email list to find out about launch readings for each issue. The Rattling Wall. This annual print literary journal is based in Los Angeles, funded […]

8 tiny pieces in New Flash Fiction Review

8 tiny pieces in New Flash Fiction Review

Are they micropoems or microstories? I’m not sure — but eight of my tiny little prose works are now up in the latest issue of New Flash Fiction Review! Here’s one to whet your appetite: The Good Day I braced hard but what I feared did not happen. For that I am grateful. Each one’s about ten words long, so they’ll be a quick read. Hope you enjoy them! Let me know what you think — Thank you to Nin Andrews, guest editor for this prose poetry issue. I’ve been a huge fan of Nin’s work since I read Why They Grow Wings back in grad school, so to have her read and take my work was a real treat. Image from New Flash Fiction Review

My novel-in-stories Cake Time to be published by Red Hen Press

I’m excited and honored to announce my novel-in-stories Cake Time won the Red Hen Fiction Manuscript Award! The book will come out in spring 2017 if all goes according to plan. Thank you to everyone who read, critiqued, and listened to the stories in this work the last few years — including my agent Peter Steinberg at Foundry Literary + Media, Edan Lepucki, Paul Mandelbaum, Chris Corning, Travis Koplow, Tanya Knox, Shilpa Argawal, Katherine Motoike, and Carolyn Peters for your valuable feedback and Lauren Eggert-Crowe, David Rocklin, and Zoë Ruiz for giving me opportunities to share pieces of Cake Time at readings. I’m so grateful to have you all in my life! Looking forward to working with everyone at Red Hen Press! And thank you in advance to the future readers who will pick up Cake Time —

Book review in Los Angeles Review: Not Dark Yet by Berit Ellingsen

My first publication of 2016 is a book review of Berit Ellingsen‘s post-apocalyptic novel, Not Dark Yet: Bombs. Strikes. Hate crimes. Droughts. Every nightly news broadcast seems catastrophic enough to require a visceral reaction from us—but what should that reaction be, exactly? In Berit Ellingsen’s novel Not Dark Yet, Brandon, the introspective protagonist, finds himself teetering between two extreme responses: a complete withdrawal from society, and a violent push to revolutionize it. Read the rest at the Los Angeles Review. You can also pick up a copy of Not Dark Yet at Two Dollar Radio, one of my favorite indie publishers!